Appeals

Minnesota Court of Appeals Attorney

Experienced Criminal Appeals Attorney Max A. Keller of Keller Law Offices has won cases in the Minnesota Supreme Court and the Minnesota Court of Appeals. Mr. Keller was the first Minnesota Criminal Defense Attorney to win a Felony DWI case in the Minnesota Supreme Court. Many attorneys don’t even know HOW to appeal a case, and will go their entire careers without filing an appeal. However, Minnesota Criminal Appeals & criminal defense attorney Max A. Keller knows how to appeal your case because he has done it many times before. And, he knows the inside scoop because he worked for 3 judges at the Court of Appeals just after graduating from law school 15 years ago.

Mr. Keller has argued over 40 cases in the Minnesota Supreme Court and Court of Appeals, including:

  • Felony DWI,
  • Felony criminal sexual conduct,
  • Possession of child pornography,
  • Gross misdemeanor DWI,
  • Driving in Violation of a B-Card No Alcohol Restriction
  • Domestic assault
  • Professional licensing issues.

Just because you were convicted of a criminal offense at trial doesn’t mean that you SHOULD have been convicted. Any trial is a complicated process involving numerous decisions from a Judge and a criminal defense attorney. During a trial, it is virtually inevitable that the Judge, the prosecutor, and the defense attorney will ALL make mistakes. Sometimes, these mistakes result in a defendant going to jail or prison when they otherwise shouldn’t. In that situation, the best thing the wrongfully convicted defendant can do is appeal.

Every criminal defendant has the right appeal of his or her conviction. In other words, if you were convicted, you can have an appellate Court review your conviction to determine whether any errors were made during the trial, either by the trial Judge, your trial attorney, or the jury. However, appellate Courts have strict requirements for criminal appeals. For example, there are specific requirements on which you have to serve documents upon and how the documents have to be served. There are specific timelines for filing your notice of appeal, ordering transcripts from your trial or motion hearings, and filing the Appellate briefs for your case. Appellate courts do not make exceptions for individuals who mistakenly file the wrong documents, or who file at the wrong time. Your appeal can be dismissed entirely if you fail to comply with proper procedures and timelines.

If you want to seek an appeal, you should find an attorney who has experience filing, briefing, and arguing criminal appeals. Max A. Keller has this experience. Max has worked at the Court of Appeals, so he knows the tricks that the Appellate Courts use. He knows how to have your appeal reviewed in a timely manner, and in the most favorable light. He knows all the timelines and service requirements. He has experience filing motions with Appellate courts in order to have your appeal reviewed in a more favorable manner. He knows how to write persuasive briefs, and how to make convincing arguments.

Mr. Keller has filed over 40 appeals in the following areas: Criminal Sexual Conduct, Child Pornography Assault/Domestic Assault, Controlled Substance Crimes, DWI, Implied Consent Driver’s License Revocations, & Professional Licensing.

Following a conviction, the time to file an appeal is short. If you’re considering pursuing an appeal, and would like to speak to an experienced Appellate attorney, contact Max A. Keller today.

Even if he didn’t represent you at the trial level, Max Keller can still help you win your appeal. The appeals courts, however, have strict timelines that must be followed, so YOU NEED TO ACT QUICKLY TO PRESERVE YOUR RIGHTS. Call (952) 913-1421 now for a Free Initial Consultation with a Minneapolis appeals attorney & criminal defense attorney OR email us.

The information you obtain at this site is not, nor is it intended to be, legal advice. You should consult an attorney for advice regarding your Individual situation. We invite you to contact us and welcome your calls, letters and electronic mail. Contacting us does not create an attorney-client relationship. Please do not send any confidential information to us until such time as an attorney-client relationship has been established.